Let's Talk About Jesus' Anger

by Paul Bonner

Every week you’ll find different types of posts here on the ABS blog. Today’s post is for teachers, to encourage conversation and reflection in your Bible study group. Each “Let’s Talk About” activity can be used at any time during your meeting and lasts approximately 10-15 minutes.

Today, let's talk about...

LET’S FIGHT

 

John 2:13-17

 It was nearly time for the Jewish Passover, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. 14 He found in the temple those who were selling cattle, sheep, and doves, as well as those involved in exchanging currency sitting there. 15 He made a whip from ropes and chased them all out of the temple, including the cattle and the sheep. He scattered the coins and overturned the tables of those who exchanged currency. 16 He said to the dove sellers, “Get these things out of here! Don’t make my Father’s house a place of business.” 17 His disciples remembered that it is written, Passion for your house consumes me.

 

Key Verse:

He made a whip from ropes and chased them all out of the temple, including the cattle and the sheep. He scattered the coins and overturned the tables of those who exchanged currency. He said to the dove sellers, “Get these things out of here! Don’t make my Father’s house a place of business.” —John 2:15-16

 

Commentary:

Jesus was mad for a reason. Several, actually. The temple tax had to be paid in local currency, so foreigners had to have their money changed. The money changers often would charge exorbitant exchange rates. The people also were required to make sacrifices for sins. Because of the long journey, many could not bring their own animals to sacrifice. Still, some animals who were brought were rejected for imperfections. The price of sacrificial animals was much higher in the temple area than elsewhere. Animal merchants made good profit in the temple courtyard. Jesus was angry at the dishonest, greedy practices of the money changers who were making a mockery of God’s house of worship.

 

Questions to Discuss:

After reading this focal Scripture, take a moment and picture how this scene unfolded. What do you see? How do you imagine the different groups of people reacted—the vendors, priests, worshipers, disciples, casual observers, even locals?

When you become angry, is it because you feel YOU have been wronged?

 

Add a Comment